Thursday, July 1, 2010

And the Rockets Red Glare...

A dark sky hung overhead as Daddy carried me, wrapped in a blanket, to the car.  Mama and my older brother were already waiting.  It was 1950 and we were driving to a hillside situated above the park where fireworks would be set off.

Patriotism was high only five years after the end of World War II.  Our flag was revered, the President respected and fear of what could happen was still raw within the hearts of all.  Bomb shelters were more common than garages and the knowledge that freedom came at a very high price (the loss of American lives) still haunted the survivors.

Silence fell across the throng of observers who had gathered as the display began.  The smell of acrid sulphuric powder filled the air as the glorious explosions lit the night sky.  Oohs and aahs erupted in unison with each new offering.  The Star Spangled Banner rang true in all the hearts.  ...Our Flag Was Still There!

C Hummel Kornell

18 comments:

  1. I was born in 1941 ~ today I still feel the emotions you so beautifully write of in your Magpie!

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  2. excellent. I was born in the late 60's and there was a different feel to the celebrations of my youth compared to today's celebrations as well. :)

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  3. "Our Flag Was Still There!" Perfect end to a wonderful story. You capture this time period so well. Thank you for sharing.

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  4. Filled with the wonderful atmosphere of other days! A very moving piece!

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  5. Patriotism in those days was meaningful even to children. Nowadays, it has declined and in certain circles it's even subject to mockery.

    Anyway, fireworks then and now are still the focus of any national celebration.

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  6. Fireworks are an uninhibited celebration of anyting seen through children's eyes and so we should!

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  7. Loved this flash fiction piece. I was born in the late 80's so I didn't go through the two world wars, but I have family who did and I think your captured their sentiments. Great job on this magpie!

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  8. Beautiful piece. I'm told I slept through most firework displays until the age of four!

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  9. a brilliant nostalgic magpie..beautiful!

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  10. Wonderful piece, to have that childlike awe is precious.....thanks for the memories...bkm

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  11. Through a few precious words, we live through another lifetime, another era - for a while.

    Thank you.

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  12. yep- my childhood memory captured! Nice Magpie

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  13. Truly inspiring piece. Thank you for sharing it.
    :-)

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  14. oh a wonderful memory...you left me with smiles....nicely told.

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  15. Thanks to all who have or will comment on my humble offering. I feel honored to have lived during a time when our country was so proud and its citizens so much aware of the cost of freedom. While we continue to fight wars, I fear the understanding of their need now sometimes escapes us. The flag my ancestors gave their lives to save is now flown upside down by unhappy, illegal aliens and our leaders commit acts of treason against us without a thought or care.

    I choose to recall those glory days of honor. I will always cover my heart during the Pledge of Allegiance and the singing of the Star Spangled Banner and will forever thank God for this Great Country, with a tear in my eye.

    Today is our day of Independence. To all who share my feelings I wish a heartfelt HAPPY FOURTH OF JULY!

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  16. There was a different feeling to the celebrations of old. Wonderful story!

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  17. I love the spiritual high of the 4th..you brought it to life so well..thank you!!

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  18. That could have been me. I remember well my dad carrying me to the car, off to watch the fireworks display. And you are right. Patriotism ran high. We actually appreciated all we had.

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